Linkspam Confronts Hates At Home

  • Aug. 17th, 2017 at 9:16 PM
Alex Schiffer @ Washington Post: Teen tackled by bystanders after vandalizing Boston Holocaust memorial
It was the second act of vandalism in less than three months at the site, located in Carmen Park near historic Faneuil Hall.

Steve LeBlanc @ US News: Gov. Baker Signs Resolution Denouncing White Nationalism
BOSTON (AP) — Republican Gov. Charlie Baker joined with Democratic leaders to sign a resolution Thursday denouncing neo-Nazism and white nationalism.


ETA: Combined Jewish Philanthropies (CJP): Donate to the New England Holocaust Memorial
Read more... )

Planning for the future.

  • Aug. 17th, 2017 at 11:35 AM
I've now purchased a new computer! It'll be here in two weeks or so. While there's nothing wrong with my current one, it's starting to get up there in computer years, and it's about time it retired and took up topiary as a hobby. Or the computer equivalent.

The last time I got a new computer was just about seven and a half years ago. Then, it was because there were genuine hardware difficulties - something had gone wrong with the interface and if I used the mouse, the keyboard went unresponsive for a few minutes, and even the trackpad wasn't working propery. I got used to a lot of keyboard shortcuts before I went in for the one I've got now. Which is still working fine, if slowly, and I don't want to disrupt the balance of anything right now. So, buying one before there's any pressing need.

Also, thank goodness my building has a doorman to sign for the package.

I figure that when the new one comes, and I have everything set up and working and reasonably sorted out, I can take all my stuff off this one and have it as a standby backup. Just put it in the closet with its peripherals unless circumstances arise it's needed.

The part I'm most dreading about all this is having to remember my passwords to everything. Maybe it's time I started writing them down.

Linkspam Marks Monumental Changes

  • Aug. 16th, 2017 at 7:01 PM
[tumblr.com profile] elfgrove: [tumblr thread re: @FanSince09 tweet: "How Millennials are killing participation trophies." re: @BNONews: "BREAKING: Protesters tear down Confederate statue in Durham, North Carolina, where it stood for nearly 100 years"]
Yeah. I said cheap and mass produced. These statues have neither artistic nor historical value. “Why did the statue go down so easy? Many “Lost Cause” era C monuments were mass-produced in the cheapest way possible for mass distribution. There wasn’t even a layer of the most basic mortar holding the pedestal to the base. Gravity was enough for granite. Cheap, tacky crap.

Antonia Noori Farzan @ Phoenix New Times: Activist Turns Confederate Memorial At Arizona Capitol Into Participation Trophy
She immediately got to work crafting two banners that say "2nd Place Participant" and "You lost, get over it."

David Krugler @ the Daily Beast: America's Forgotten Mass Lynching: When 237 People Were Murdered In Arkansas
What made 1919 unique was the armed resistance that black Americans mounted against white mobs trying to keep them “in their place.”

Ken Schwencke @ ProPublica: Service Provider Boots Hate Site Off the Internet
“This is fucking serious. 8/12 changed everything,” tweeted Pax Dickinson, a lead technical voice for the far right, referencing the Charlottesville rally.

Nicholas Fandos, Russell Goldman, & Jess Bidgood @ NYT: Baltimore Mayor Had Statues Removed in ‘Best Interest of My City’
History could not and should not be erased, [Kaylyn Meyers, 29] said, but men like Taney did not belong on a pedestal in a nice public park, either.

[personal profile] siderea: [US] Fwd: New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu's Address of May 19
Starts good, gets great: New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu's magnificent address of May 19 on the removal of the Confederate monuments from New Orleans. It's 22 minutes long, and, Americans, it's absolutely worth making the time. Beautiful, firey, and uplifting, it's worth hearing it delivered rather than reading a transcript.

3 Good Things

  • Aug. 16th, 2017 at 5:14 PM
I've been in a minor funk of executive dysfunction the last few days. Today was better; here are some joys that made it so:

1. I swung by the cobbler's on my lunch break in hopes he might do leather repair other than shoes (the stitching attaching the shoulder strap on my beloved black handbag unexpectedly gave way yesterday). He initially said no, then changed his mind to yes when I showed it to him, and he did a gorgeous restitching job in time for me to pick it up on my way home.

2. The leftover carrot-zucchini cake I made for the friend who runs my D&D group (in honor of his birthday, and last night being the last D&D session of our current arc) was enthuastically devoured by my coworkers.

3. I had chicken dumpling ZOMG-so-much-spinach soup for lunch, and it was good. (I finally made the damn soup Monday night, after two weeks of stressful waffling on when exactly I'd get to it, so to have that done, and to move on to the simple pleasure of enjoying it, is very good indeed).

I'm pretty sure it's impossible for me to get everything I have to get done at work this week before I leave early Friday for a few days of vacation, but I've already managed more than I'd thought I might when pulling a 12hr work day Friday wasn't enough to whittle it down to a reasonable amount.

One day at a time is enough, betimes.

I feel like I should say

  • Aug. 16th, 2017 at 12:02 PM
U.S. politics has (have?) washed over my head again, as it does periodically, rising from the baseline fear and disappointment that mounted during election season and spiked in November.

I don't talk about it much here. This blog, and [twitter.com profile] bironicwastaken, are my dedicated fannish spaces online. It looks like we all understand that media consumption, fannishness and other creative pursuits are permissible hobbies, community building in an environment of divisiveness, necessary breaks and even artistic acts of resistance as we struggle with current events. Still, I sometimes (1) worry that fannish-oriented posts strike the wrong tone in wider context, such as yesterday's, and (2) feel a defensive urge to point out that I'm doing things "in real life" to fight what's happening, even if they may not be enough and even though no one has said anything.

When I get down on myself about not doing enough, I focus on things like these, in addition to thinking through how I can have a greater impact:
- Since November, every feature article I’ve written at work has made an explicit or strong implicit political statement
- This auction vid not only raised money for a good cause but is also about celebrating many characters of color in current genre sources, and that's not for nothing these days
- Every month, I donate to activist, investigative journalism and/or minority-support organizations
- I talk to people, including family and friends who voted in ways I am trying to understand
- etc.

That is all. It's a[nother] tough day. ETA: Not least: Event & dream involving anti-semitism )

Hero of the hour.

  • Aug. 15th, 2017 at 10:18 PM
It only hits me now I might have run out of time to make eclipse plans. Glasses seem to be sold out everywhere online. There's the Museum of Natural History's big viewing event, which I may well leave work early to attend. Though if it's as cloudy then as it was today, I might just walk to the nearest park and stand outside at the appropriate time rather than try anything else.

On some level, clouds in August - or all of summer, really - is just wrong to me. It makes me think it's late September, and turns every day of the week into Thursday.

So I did my best to stay active, and cleaned out and got rid of a bunch of stuff hanging around my apartment. Mostly papers, with a little garbage and no small amount of dust. Spreading it out onto my bed and forcing myself to look at everything was a big help in terms of making practical assessments. Most of it was done to Hawaii 5-0, which somehow makes for ideal apartment-cleaning TV.

What’s up, August edition: vidding

  • Aug. 15th, 2017 at 10:46 AM
It's periodic crunch time at work, so a proper post / con report will have to wait a bit longer. For now:

[community profile] vividcon was lovely. I had some good conversations with a few people I'd expected to catch up with and a few I had not; went to most of the panels; saw only a fraction of the vids screened but still came away with several favorites; stayed on an even emotional keel the whole weekend; and returned with renewed vigor for creative pursuits…

…most notably this extensive auction vid that's been in progress since the spring. After VVC I finally processed all the DVD footage I've been collecting, figured out how to get a bunch of MKV files into Adobe Premiere (tried [personal profile] absolutedestiny's FFmpeg tutorial for format conversion but gave up in favor of DirectShowSource in the more familiar Avisynth), and skimmed two seasons of American Horror Story with [personal profile] drglam's guidance. I'd been putting that off along with The Walking Dead & Z Nation because horror TV is not always my thing, but it went fine. Forging onward.

Meanwhile, I made the mistake of perusing [community profile] equinox_exchange requests on the AO3 and ended up with a vid idea that I don't have time to make, except I started making it. *facepalm* I don't even go here, as they say, but I think the concept is beautiful, and the draft is making me have an emotion. Fortunately, what at first seemed like an intimidating endeavor is coming together faster than expected.

Still, my primary focus needs to be the auction vid, and I'll be away three of the six weekends between now and Equinox go-live, so we'll see if this other vid gets done in time or if the DS9 vidlet began a tradition of posting treats three months late.

Just for pun.

  • Aug. 14th, 2017 at 10:11 PM
At work today, someone said he'd done medical coding himself, a long time ago.

"Like COBOL?" I asked. No, he said, nothing like that, mostly data entry.

"So not a very BASIC job," I said. And boy, once he got it, did he mean it when he laughed.

Femslashex Dear Creator Letter

  • Aug. 13th, 2017 at 7:32 PM
(to be completed)

Harlots (TV)
Violet Cross/Amelia Scanwell

The Black Tapes Podcast
Alex Reagan/Amelia Chenkova

The Raven and the Reindeer - T. Kingfisher
Gerta/Janna

Six of Crows Series - Leigh Bardugo
Inej Ghafa/Nina Zenik
Chapter 32: Emotional Rescue
Pairs: Hurley/Claire, Jack/Kate, Sayid/Shannon
Characters: Hugo Reyes, Claire Littleton, Jack Shephard, Kate Austen, ensemble
Genre: Slow-build Romance
Length: 3582 words
Rating: M
Notes: WIP, canon-divergent

After the Oceanic 815 crash, Jack told Hurley to stay with Claire. Hurley does just that, and they fall in love. In this "LOST in three seasons," people talk to each other more, and most of them actually get to live.

Chapter 32: Emotional Rescue )

I think I succeeded.

  • Aug. 10th, 2017 at 10:15 PM
I took a boat ride out to eat pie today, which is as it should be. To be precise, I rode a ferry out to Brooklyn, because New York City is an archipelago and a ferry was faster than the subway, and then walked to where I could eat key lime pie. Real key lime pie, made with just five ingredients, out in Red Hook right by the water. My brother was with me, and we ate on the grass by a miniature beach, having walked through a part of New York City I'd never been to that more than anything reminded me of San Francisco. Not exactly for the food, and not exactly for the water. More in that it was a bright, sunny day with few clouds and little wind, that where I was walking happened to have the lazy, low-horizon line architecture of the California Bay Area, small houses clustered together with the incidental empty lot left to grass and flowers and birds, funky little shops scattered up and down a main drag, a town hidden away out at the edge of a city.

Sometime after I got back to Manhattan, I realized there was a bit of sadness to the day too: I had to retire one of my rings. One of my favorites, to be honest. The little lizard pinkie ring I bought almost thirteen years ago to the day, back in August of 2004 in the Yerba Buena Gardens during a Philippine arts and culture festival just after I moved to San Francisco for college, worn until August of 2017 when the ring finally began to wear thin enough I'm worried it'll snap in two. So I took it off, kissed it, and put it away. I'm adjusting to a different one now. It's got leaves, but no little lizard face.

I can replace it easily enough - it's a common enough design that just looking up "lizard toe ring" on Google gets me the same thing right away, like right here. But it won't be the one I used to wear, and I'm hesitant to look into repair shops because it'd be so easy to replace it might not get taken seriously.

And though I wish I still had a smiling little lizard on my hand, it's not yet broken. I can take comfort in knowing it's not broken, or lost. In threat of those, but I didn't let that happen. I took it off and now it's put someplace for safekeeping. It saw me through a lot of adventures, like the one I had today, running to catch the ferry back, riding up front and feeling a bit of spray on my face and stepping away from my life to enjoy the world for a while.

So I guess, with this new ring, I start over again tomorrow.

Media log

  • Aug. 6th, 2017 at 9:40 AM
Reading

After a long stretch of not reading very much at all, I've picked up several books to prepare for my trip to Russia in three weeks....

Russia and the Russians by Geoffrey Hosking is a decent one-volume history, although it has very little good to say about the orthodox church.

The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia by Orlando Figes is a monumental work of social history. Difficult to follow because there are so many stories included as part of it, but a page-turning account of the worldview of ordinary Russians under Stalinism. Humans will go through so many mental contortions to make their lives livable, understandable or justifiable for themselves.

Second-Hand Time by Svetlana Alexievich is a collective oral history of the transition from Soviet to post-Soviet Russia. She won the Nobel prize for literature despite writing non-fiction; this is an amazing collection of stories. Impressionistic and vivid. One of the most emotionally difficult books I've read, ever, but this is not a dis-recommendation. Just be prepared.

And on top of this I'm trying to get back into my Icelandic. Another go at Pálssaga by Ólafur Jóhann Sigurðsson, which tells the story of Iceland in the World War II era from the point of view of a young journalist.

Watching

In the wake of the Tour de France, there have been so many different cycling races on simultaneously. I picked the Vuelta a Burgos partly because of the start list but mostly because of the commentating team of Matt Stephens and Brian Smith. They're not as tactically oriented as David Millar but they offer great insights on the riders. OK, they did spend about five minutes talking about one rider before remembering he wasn't in the race, but that was endearing.

I've been hearing here and there about Comrade Detective, the new Amazon comedy whose shtick is that it's a 'rediscovered' cop show from '80s Romania intended to glorify Communism. Reviews are mixed. The Guardian liked it a lot. Neither Variety nor Vulture think it's actually meant to be funny. Vanity Fair focuses on the idea that it's meant to be a statement about propaganda.

But I would like to hear more thoughts from Romanians. There's some unsurprisingly unamused commentary from vrabia on Tumblr, which has only whetted my appetite for a detailed deconstruction.

Anyway I've watched the first episode and... I wouldn't call it good, but it's intriguing? The setting, the visuals seem really well done, and I'm half willing to watch it just for its evocation of '80s Bucharest. The fact that they hired Romanian actors and then dubbed the whole thing as a star vehicle for American actors probably tells you all you need to know. Very literally talked over. The characters and plot are formulaic but that's the point... it's an evocation and celebration of the (Western) genre. The Communist ideology seems notably off-kilter and I say that as someone who's not an expert in Communist ideology. And yet there's something fascinating about how mixed and meta and just weird the whole thing is. In cultural appropriation terms it obviously gets a 9.9 out of 10, but I may keep watching because I'm curious. I wonder whether it will be a Yuletide fandom, and if so, what people will do with it.

(This also makes me want to watch more films/TV that were actually made behind the Iron Curtain. Someone seems to have uploaded a selection of Russian classics to Daily Motion... The Irony of Fate, Office Romance, Moscow Does Not Believe In Tears...)

I keep trying to decide whether or not I actually want to go and see Dunkirk. By the time I decide it won't be in the cinemas any longer.

And finally I really want to see Icarus, a new documentary about drug testing in cycling that accidentally revealed exactly how much the head of Moscow's Anti-Doping Centre knew about how to beat the system.

Profile

my_daroga: Mucha's "Dance" (Default)
[personal profile] my_daroga
my_daroga

Latest Month

October 2013
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Tags

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios
Designed by [personal profile] chasethestars